All posts by intrepidmuses

Intrepid Muses is Four Years Old!!!

Four years ago I started Intrepid Muse with the following post:

“He is a sane man who can have tragedy in his heart and comedy in his head.”

GK Chesterton
Tremendous Trifles

And so it begins….my first official post.


It has been an fun four years hanging around the blogging community. That is when actually I have time to do so…nevertheless thank you for all my friends from the States and Australia for keeping an eye on my little blog.

God Bless,

Caleb

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A quite place, spoiler: it’s not about the monsters.

From time to time Hollywood gets it and gets right. A Quite Place represents Hollywood as its best. John Kransinski, the co-writer and director, provides a coherent thriller that appeals to our visceral instincts for survival as well as our inner most calling for self-sacrificial love. A Quite Place tells the story of a family’s struggles for survival in a world overrun by creatures that hunt by sound.

A Quite Place does not lack suspense or scary parts, there are plenty, but that is not what makes the movie stand out. What makes it stand out is something that Hollywood often neglects in its story and that is its appeal to universally shared values. At its core, A Quite Place is a film about family and parenthood. It does not preach but shows the unquenchable love that parents have for their children. At a deeper level, it reminds the audience that family it’s the foundation of any civilization. That in as long as there is the building unit of the family there is the simples form of society upon which civilizations can emerge.

At the end, the film was not about scary monsters. It was about something real, far more powerful than any creature real or imagine, it was about the power of love that unites a family.

Cheers,

Caleb

Christ is Risen! Aleluia!

Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went away quickly from the tomb, fearful yet overjoyed, and ran to announce the news to his disciples. And behold, Jesus met them on their way and greeted them.

Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid.

They approached, embraced his feet, and did him homage.
Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid. Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee,  and there they will see me.”

Matthew 28:8-10

“We do not pretend that life is all beauty. We are aware of darkness and sin, of poverty and pain. But we know Jesus has conquered sin and passed through his own pain to the glory of the Resurrection. And we live in the light of his Paschal Mystery – the mystery of his Death and Resurrection. We are an Easter People and Alleluia is our song!”

St. John Paul II
Angelus given in Adelaide, Australia

Good Friday Reflection on the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

crucifixion

Mental Sufferings of Our Lord in His Passion
by Cardinal John Henry Newman

EVERY passage in the history of our Lord and Saviour is of unfathomable depth, and affords inexhaustible matter of contemplation. All that concerns Him is infinite, and what we first discern is but the surface of that which begins and ends in eternity. It would be presumptuous for any one short of saints and doctors to attempt to comment on His words and deeds, except in the way of meditation; but meditation and mental prayer are so much a duty in all who wish to cherish true faith and love towards Him, that it may be allowed us, my brethren, under the guidance of holy men who have gone before us, to dwell and enlarge upon what otherwise would more fitly be adored than scrutinised. And certain times of the year, this especially [Note], call upon us to consider, as closely and minutely as we can, even the more sacred portions of the Gospel history. I would rather be thought feeble or officious in my treatment of them, than wanting to the Season; and so I now proceed because the religious usage of the Church requires it, {324} and though any individual preacher may well shrink from it, to direct your thoughts to a subject, especially suitable now, and about which many of us perhaps think very little, the sufferings which our Lord endured in His innocent and sinless soul.

To continue reading click here.

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“O Heart of Jesus, all Love, I offer Thee these humble prayers for myself, and for all those who unite themselves with me in Spirit to adore Thee. O holiest Heart of Jesus most lovely, I intend to renew and to offer to Thee these acts of adoration and these prayers, for myself a wretched sinner, and for all those who are associated with me in Thy adoration, through all moments while I breathe, even to the end of my life. I recommend to Thee, O my Jesus, Holy Church, Thy dear spouse and our true Mother, all just souls and all poor sinners, the afflicted, the dying, and all mankind. Let not Thy Blood be shed for them in vain. Finally, deign to apply it in relief of the souls in Purgatory, of those in particular who have practised in the course of their life this holy devotion of adoring Thee.”

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Discourse 16

ST. THÉRÈSE OF LISIEUX “The little flower”

An excerpt from St. Thérèse of Lisieux, autobiography, The Story of a  soul:

I often asked myself why God had preferences, why all souls did not receive an equal measure of grace. I was filled with wonder when I saw extraordinary favours showered on great sinners like St. Paul, St. Augustine, St. Mary Magdalen, and many others, whom He forced, so to speak, to receive His grace. In reading the lives of the Saints I was surprised to see that there were certain privileged souls, whom Our Lord favoured from the cradle to the grave, allowing no obstacle in their path which might keep them from mounting towards Him, permitting no sin to soil the spotless brightness of their baptismal robe. And again it puzzled me why so many poor savages should die without having even heard the name of God.

He showed me the book of nature, and I understood that every flower created by Him is beautiful, that the brilliance of the rose and the whiteness of the lily do not lessen the perfume of the violet or the sweet simplicity of the daisy.

Our Lord has deigned to explain this mystery to me. He showed me the book of nature, and I understood that every flower created by Him is beautiful, that the brilliance of the rose and the whiteness of the lily do not lessen the perfume of the violet or the sweet simplicity of the daisy. I understood that if all the lowly flowers wished to be roses, nature would lose its springtide beauty, and the fields would no longer be enamelled with lovely hues. And so it is in the world of souls, Our Lord’s living garden. He has been pleased to create great Saints who may be compared to the lily and the rose, but He has also created lesser ones, who must be content to be daisies or simple violets flowering at His Feet, and whose mission it is to gladden His Divine Eyes when He deigns to look down on them. And the more gladly they do His Will the greater is their perfection.

St. Thérèse of Lisieux pray for us! 

 

Anglo-Saxon Christian Poetry

The Dream of Rood is one of the early Anglo-Saxon Christian poems dating back to the 8th century.    The poem is riveting.   It was  clear attempt to evangelized the warrior like culture of Nordic people.

The Dream of the Rood (Cross)

I saw then the Savior of mankind
hasten with great zeal as if he wanted to climb up on me…

He stripped himself then, young hero -that was God almighty-
strong and resolute; he ascended on the high gallows,
brave in the sight of many, when he wanted to ransom mankind

Translation taken from the Book of Viking Myths by Peter Archer.

For full poem:  https://anglosaxonpoetry.camden.rutgers.edu/dream-of-the-rood/

Happy Lent to everyone!

Caleb

Apologetic Mondays: Call No Man Father

Objection:
Catholics disobey Christ when they call priests “fathers”.

Argument:
It is an unbiblical practice that Jesus forbade in Matthew 23:9:

“Call no man your father on earth, for you have one Father, who is in heaven”

Response:

In Matthew 23:9 Jesus is using rabbinic hyperbole to drive a point. Rabbinic hyperbole is the use of exaggerated terms to make a point. For example, in Matthew 5:29-30, Jesus says if your right hand or eye offends you, cut it off and pluck it out. Certainly, no reasonable person would interpret this passage as Jesus commanding us to cut our hand and pluck our eye. Jesus is emphasizing the severity of sin through the use of hyperbole*.

In the same way in Matthew 23:8-10 Jesus is not prohibiting us to call our teachers, teacher, our fathers, father and our leaders, leader, but rather he is using rabbinic hyperbole to drive the point that the Pharisees have forgotten their proper place in the drama of salvation. The context of Mathew 23 makes this clear. In later verses, Jesus makes a sharp indictment against the hypocrisy of the scribes and Pharisees:

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, you hypocrites. You pay tithesof mint and dill and cummin, and have neglected the weightier things of the law: judgment and mercy and fidelity. [But] these you should have done, without neglecting the others.

-Matthew 23:23

Proponents of this objection would respond that what Jesus prohibited was to call no man your spiritual father. However, in the light of the scriptures this interpretation of Matthew 23:9 is problematic:

Jesus himself calls Abraham not only as the physical father of the Jews, but also as his spiritual father:

Abraham your father rejoiced to see my day; he saw it and was glad.

-John 8:56

As did Stephen in Act 7:2, The God of glory appeared to our father Abraham. Paul refers to Isaac as our father in Romans 9:10. Moreover, Paul, calls himself a spiritual father:

I am writing you this not to shame you, but to admonish you as my beloved children. Even if you should have countless guides to Christ, yet you do not have many fathers, for I became your father in Christ Jesus through the gospel. Therefore, I urge you, be imitators of me.

-1 Corinthian 4:14-16

Peter, Paul and John all at one point or another framed their relationship with their disciples as that of a parental relationship:

She who is at Babylon, who is likewise chosen, sends you greetings; and so does my son Mark”

-Peter 5:13

“My little children, I am writing this to you so that you may not sin; but if any one does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous”

-1 John 2:1

Conclusion:

Given that these authors were writing under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit it is hard to presuppose that they were disobeying Christ, when they refer to themselves as fathers. Thus, the biblical evidence and the context of Matthew 23:9 reasonably argues against its literal interpretation. Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran interpret Matthew 23:9 in the same light as the Catholic Church does and do call their priests fathers with the implied understanding that there is only but one Father that gives life, namely God the Father.

References and Resources:

Catholic Resources:

*Steve Ray

http://www.catholic-convert.com/wp-content/uploads/Documents/CallNoManFather.pdf

Catholic Answers: Call no man Father?

https://www.catholic.com/tract/call-no-man-father

Lutheran resources:

Rev. James P. Peterson

http://lutheranreformission.blogspot.com/2013/10/should-pastors-be-called-father.html