Category Archives: History

D-Day

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS
ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hope and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is will trained, well equipped and battle-hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory!

Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower


So Proud to be an American
God Bless our Veterans!

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In Flanders Fields

By John McCree

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place, and in the sky,
The larks, still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe!
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high!
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

Happy Epiphany of the Lord

Hi everyone and Merry Christmas!

I hope everyone had a wonderful New Year! Today we celebrate the Epiphany of the Lord. I will like to share an excerpt from today’s gospel reading along with a quote from St. John Chrysostom, an early Patristic father of the Church, reflecting on the epiphany.

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A reflection on today’s reading by St. John Chrysostom:

“And behold, the star that they had seen at its rising preceded them,
until it came and stopped over the place where the child was.
They were overjoyed at seeing the star,
and on entering the house
they saw the child with Mary his mother.
They prostrated themselves and did him homage.
Then they opened their treasures
and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh”.

Matthew 2:10-12

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“If the Magi had come in search of an earthly King, they would have been disconcerted at finding that they had taken the trouble to come such a long way for nothing. Consequently they would have neither adored nor offered gifts. But since they sought a heavenly King, though they found in Him no signs of royal pre-eminence, yet, content with the testimony of the star alone, they adored: for they saw a man, and they acknowledged God.”

Saint John Chrysostom

Cheers,

Caleb

 

“I have lived for Christ; I want to die for Christ.”

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Today is the feast day of blessed Maria Restituta Kafka, a brave nun who was martyred by the Nazis during WWII.

The following is an article by Brian O’Neel, author of 39 Saints You Should Know,  is from Legatus.org and can be found here.

Sister Maria served the sick and she stood up to the Nazi regime despite the cost . . .

The Nazis’ wickedness cowed many into silence, but not Maria Restituta. Born Helen Kafka, she grew up in Vienna, Austria. After leaving school at 15, Helen tried her hand at various jobs before settling on a nursing career with the Franciscan Sisters of Christian Charity.

Helen took the name Restituta after a martyr who had been beheaded. She worked as a surgical nurse, and her hospital’s best surgeon was difficult. Nobody wanted to work with him except Restituta. She was soon running his operating room. People called her “Sr. Resolute” because of her stubbornness. Mostly, however, Restituta was easy-going. After work, she’d visit the local pub and order goulash and “a pint of the usual.”

After Restituta hung a crucifix in every room of her hospital’s new wing, the Nazis ordered them taken down. She refused. The crucifixes stayed. However, when the Gestapo found anti-Nazi propaganda on her, she was sentenced to death for treason.

Restituta spent her remaining days ministering to other prisoners. As she approached the guillotine, her last words were, “I have lived for Christ; I want to die for Christ.”


May this Easter Season be fill with Christ’s Joy and Hope!

Thanks to Catholic Saints Guy for his post on Sr. Restituta.