Category Archives: Prayer

A light in the midst of darkness

Last week terror attack at Brussels reminded us of the nature of evil but in the middle of such human cruelty a ray of consolation shine through on one unlikely place the womb of a mom who survived the attack at Zaventem international airport.

She penned this touching letter for her unborn baby the day of the attack after visiting a hospital for an ultrasound:

Hi Sweetheart,

I don’t know if we already acknowledged this with you in person, but when you were 16 weeks old, mum and dad were in an explosion at Brussels Airport.
And no matter where humanity is today, I just want to tell you that life is a wonderful thing, and the world is really full of remarkable people.
You didn’t just give mum and dad faith and reasdon to live, you gave the awareness and presence of mind like never before.
I felt more alive than I ever have, and I knew I had to protect you, so I was calm, composed and fully aware that we will survive.
When we reached Sint-Augustinus emergency, and we saw you oblivious and sucking at your thumb at the ultrasound, and doing your general acrobatics, all the mistrust, hate and angst for the terrorist attack vaporized.
I do hope with all my heart that you are born into a better world, and if not, then you do absolute best to make it that.
You are absolutely precious to us and have already been a hero today.
I guess [because] the world has sent so much love and hope your way, you owe your life to reciprocating that goodness.
May you always be brave and healthy.


We love you beyond words,

Mum and Dad

From National Catholic Register article: Brussels Survivor Writes Touching Letter to Unborn Baby.

Advertisements

Mental Sufferings of Our Lord in His Passion by Cardinal John Henry Newman

crucifixion

EVERY passage in the history of our Lord and Saviour is of unfathomable depth, and affords inexhaustible matter of contemplation. All that concerns Him is infinite, and what we first discern is but the surface of that which begins and ends in eternity. It would be presumptuous for any one short of saints and doctors to attempt to comment on His words and deeds, except in the way of meditation; but meditation and mental prayer are so much a duty in all who wish to cherish true faith and love towards Him, that it may be allowed us, my brethren, under the guidance of holy men who have gone before us, to dwell and enlarge upon what otherwise would more fitly be adored than scrutinised. And certain times of the year, this especially [Note], call upon us to consider, as closely and minutely as we can, even the more sacred portions of the Gospel history. I would rather be thought feeble or officious in my treatment of them, than wanting to the Season; and so I now proceed because the religious usage of the Church requires it, {324} and though any individual preacher may well shrink from it, to direct your thoughts to a subject, especially suitable now, and about which many of us perhaps think very little, the sufferings which our Lord endured in His innocent and sinless soul.

To continue reading click here.

* * * * * *

“O Heart of Jesus, all Love, I offer Thee these humble prayers for myself, and for all those who unite themselves with me in Spirit to adore Thee. O holiest Heart of Jesus most lovely, I intend to renew and to offer to Thee these acts of adoration and these prayers, for myself a wretched sinner, and for all those who are associated with me in Thy adoration, through all moments while I breathe, even to the end of my life. I recommend to Thee, O my Jesus, Holy Church, Thy dear spouse and our true Mother, all just souls and all poor sinners, the afflicted, the dying, and all mankind. Let not Thy Blood be shed for them in vain. Finally, deign to apply it in relief of the souls in Purgatory, of those in particular who have practised in the course of their life this holy devotion of adoring Thee.”

Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman
Discourse 16

Merry Christmas!!!

To all my fellow bloggers thank you for the encouragement, lively debates and support that I have received through this past year. It is wonderful to be able to share our thoughts and hopes with the world. My wishes for this Christmas is that the light of the world made flesh may bless you, give you wisdom and illuminate your life with his graces. As Catharine of Sienna once said: be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire!

Merry Christmas,

Caleb

holyfamily

Adeste Fideles

O come all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant,
O come ye, o come ye to Bethlehem.
Come and behold him, born the king of angels.
O come let us adore him, O come let us adore him,
O come let us adore him, Christ the Lord.

God of God, light of light,
Lo! He abhors not the Virgin’s womb.
Very God, Begotten not created;
O come let us adore him, O come let us adore him,
O come let us adore him, Christ, the Lord.

Yea, Lord, we greet Thee, born this happy morning,
Jesus, to thee be all glory given.
Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing;
O come let us adore him, O come let us adore him,
O come let us adore him, Christ, the Lord.

There shall we see him, his eternal Father’s
Everlasting brightness now veiled under flesh.
God shall we find there, a babe in infant clothing;
O come let us adore him, O come let us adore him,
O come let us adore him, Christ the Lord.

Child, for us sinners, poor and in the manger,
WE would embrace thee, with love and awe.
Who would not love thee, loving us so dearly?
O come let us adore him, O come let us adore him,
O come let us adore him, Christ the Lord.


Historian Rod Bennett argues that although the earliest copies of Adeste fideles are dated to a period much later than the Arian heresy (an early heresy that denies the divinity of Christ and argues that Christ is a created being), there is good reason to believe that the original words were passed down from the time of the original Arian controversy.

St. Thérèse of Lisieux

saint-therese-of-lisieux-12

“Miss no single opportunity of making some small sacrifice, here by a smiling look, there by a kindly word; always doing the smallest right and doing it all for love.”

-St. Thérèse of Lisieux

Today is the feast day of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, the little flower of child of Jesus. She is the catholic patron saint of missionaries, although she never left her convent. She is the youngest Doctor of the Church, a very special title for those saints whom preaching and writings have help defend and solidify orthodoxy in Christian teaching. Her autobiography “Story of a Soul” is one of the most powerful modern testimonies of Christian faith. She entered the Carmelite order when she was just 15 years old and died from Tuberculosis when she was only 24 years old.

In honor of her feast day here is one of her poems:

MY HOPE

Though in a foreign land I dwell afar,
I taste in dreams the endless joys of heaven.
Fain would I fly beyond the farthest star,
And see the wonders to the ransomed given!
No more the sense of exile weighs on me,
When once I dream of that immortal day.
To my true fatherland, dear God! I see,
For the first time I soon shall fly away.
Ah! give me, Jesus! wings as white as snow,
That unto Thee I soon may take my flight.
I long to be where flowers unfading blow;
I long to see Thee, O my heart’s Delight!
I long to fly to Mary’s mother arms,
To rest upon that spotless throne of bliss;
And, sheltered there from troubles and alarms,
For the first time to feel her gentle kiss.
Thy first sweet smile of welcoming delight
Soon show, O Jesus! to Thy lowly bride;
O’ercome with rapture at that wondrous sight,
Within Thy Sacred Heart, ah! let me hide.
O happy moment! and O heavenly grace!
When I shall hear Thee, Jesus, speak to me;
And the full vision of Thy glorious Face
For the first time my longing eyes shall see.
Thou knowest well, my only martyrdom
Is love, O Heart of Jesus Christ! for Thee;
And if my soul craves for its heavenly home,
‘Tis but to love Thee more, eternally.
Above, when Thy sweet Face unveiled I view,
Measure nor bounds shall to my love be given;
Forever my delight shall seem as new
As the first time my spirit entered heaven.

St. Thérèse of Lisieux
June 12, 1896

St. Thérèse of Lisieux “Little flower of the Child of Jesus” pray for us!

An example of humility and love: Two stories about St. John Vianney

timthumb.php

 

Yesterday was the feast day of St. John Vianney and I will like to share with you two stories about this great saint that I read from National Catholic Register article titled 10 Important things to be Happy about Today by Simcha Fisher:

I am quoting from the article.

1. Today is the feast day of John Vianney, the Curé of Ars.

He tended not to notice how ratty his clothes were getting, because he was so busy taking care of his flock, hearing confessions for eleven hours a day, spending his free time with orphans and at adoration.  He often had supernatural knowledge of the private state of people’s souls. But my favorite story is when some disgruntled parishioners circulated a petition to the bishop to have him removed as pastor for being ” incompetent, lazy, ineffective, [and] driving people away.”

So . . . he signed the petition. Womp womp. St. John Vianney, pray for priests!
2. More awesomeness: He has a message of hope for people who’ve endured the suicide of a loved one.

A woman told St. John Vianney that she was devastated because her husband had committed suicide. She wanted to approach the great priest but his line often lasted for hours and she could not reach him. She was ready to give up and in a moment of mystical insight that only a great saint can receive, John Vianney exclaimed through the crowd, “He is saved!” The woman was incredulous so the saint repeated, stressing each word, “I tell you he is saved. He is in Purgatory, and you must pray for him. Between the parapet of the bridge and the water he had time to make an act of contrition.”

Read more:

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/simcha-fisher/ten-important-things-to-be-happy-about-today/#ixzz3hxXOxLs2

St.  John Vianney pray for us!!!