Tag Archives: Manhood

The World

lake reflection copy

The world was growing old
but we were growing young.

Holding hands with grew up together
while the world lost its patience

with our ways.

On forts built on the fields of our minds
we stood alone together

as the world went mad.

We took our swords and declared
with valiant bravado

our war.

For it was worth the fight!

Truth was drowning in a faceless crowd
chatting the end of right and wrong.

Beauty was confused for cynicism and honor
had lost its meaning.

We made our stand on the shadows
of giants.

For we were not alone.

All the saints from St. Pious V to
to Joan of Arc awaited at the gates

to make new what the world made old.

Caleb
GTG


The line in GK Chesterton poem in The Man Who Was Thursday that reads:

The world was old and ended: but you and I were gay;” 

The juxtaposition between the rambunctious energy of the youth and the tired and old false promises of the world hunted me ever since I first read this poem. It is a war that has been ranging since the fall of man, between the Good, the true and the beautiful and sin.

The other night this line pop again in my mind. Soon after I found myself writing the verses that made up these poor prose and my 100 post.

The Son (Updated version)

Last week I read an article about the transition from sonship to manhood entitled, In Defense of Gentlemanly Things, published in Those Catholic Men website. There were two lines that really resonated with me:

“We need traditions, because they are the glue between generations.  A boy’s first cigar does not make him a man, but the man that handed it to him might”.

-Jason Craig

I thought it was brilliantly true. As men we like to do things. That is how learned from our fathers and grow in friendship with other men. In every hiking trip, beach outing, skateboarding road-trips there are a myriad of opportunities to impart life long lessons about the virtues without even saying a word about them. We mostly learn through observation. The misattributed quote to St. Francis of Assisi somewhat illustrated this point:

“Preach the Gospel at all times. Use words if necessary”.

-Not St. Francis of Assisi

Properly understood this quote does not relegate preaching the gospel with words to a secondary plane, the words are often utterly necessary, rather what it says, is that actions give the weight to the words. This is especially true in the eyes of a young man. Thinking about my own childhood and all the time with my dad this rings true.

Inspired by this article last week I wrote The Son, a poem about growing up. I rushed it. I thought there was something missing. That line, “A boy’s first cigar does not make him a man, but the man that handed it to him might”, inspired me to write the poem in the first place and yet it wasn’t clear. So here is my second attempt:

The Son (updated)

Men leading their son
to the everlasting hills…

Christening in their hearts
an indelible mark

Of how to be a man!

Rocking oldfangled cigars
racing against time.

In a minute, it will be to late,

for the sun swiftly rises
in young man’s eyes.

In an instant, over time,

along all the miles hiked
models built and stories told

of a bygone time

when men were men
and sanity was sane,

it happen.

The heart met the man.

Hands on courage!

For it is not the cigar nor
whiskey drank,

miles hiked nor models built
that makes the man

but a virtuous life lived
in front of a son’s eyes!

Caleb
GTG

The Son

The Son

Men leading their son
to the everlasting hills…

Christening in their hearts
an indelible mark

Of how to be a man!

Rocking oldfangled cigars
racing against time.

In a minute, it will be to late,

for the sun rises swiftly
in young man’s eyes.

In an instant, over time,

along all the miles hiked
models built and tales told…

of a bygone time,

when men were men
and sanity was sane

it happen.

Hands on courage!

For it is a virtuous life,
lived in front of a son’s eyes,

that makes the man!

Caleb
GTG